Bird's-Eye View

Every day, people across the world will make decisions or innovations that affect the way Hoosiers live. We’ll track the changes so you’re ready for them.

EXTREME TEMPERATURES FEEL MORE 'NORMAL'

Extreme weather events are becoming more common, and people may be getting used to extreme temperatures after just a few years, according to a recent study.
(New York Times   )

INDIGENOUS AGRICULTURE COULD ANSWER FOOD PROBLEM

The restoration of indigenous food systems could help communities affected by climate change.
(Science Daily   )

LAKE ERIE GRANTED SAME LEGAL RIGHTS AS PEOPLE

Residents of Toledo, Ohio Tuesday voted to grant Lake Erie the same rights as a person. The lake’s new rights allow citizens to sue on behalf of the lake when it is danger of major environmental harm.
(Vox   )

BRITISH WILD CARNIVORE POPULATIONS RECOVERING

The reduction of harmful human trapping and hunting tactics, namely habitat destruction and the use of toxic chemicals, has allowed the recovery of British wild carnivores.
(University of Exeter   )

RISING SEA LEVELS THREATEN MARSHALL ISLANDS

The Marshall Islands, an independent country in the Pacific Ocean, is planning to raise its islands to protect them from being swallowed by rising sea levels.
(Radio New Zealand   )

GENE EDITING COULD ERADICATE MOSQUITO SPECIES

Researchers in Italy are attempting to genetically modify mosquitoes to stop them from reproducing, with the goal of helping eradicate malaria in Africa.
(NPR   )

INSECT DECLINE A BAD SIGN FOR GLOBAL ECOSYSTEMS

Insect biomass is decreasing by 2.5 percent a year, eight times faster than the rate of decline for mammals, birds or reptiles. Insects pollinate 75 percent of all the crops in the world.
(Biological Conservation   )

DRUG RESIDUE IS PUTTING FRESH WATER AT RISK

Since 1995, concentrations of pharmaceuticals in freshwater have increased. Concentrations of antibioticscan be harmful to bacteria in the water, which play an important role in nutrient cycles and wastewater treatment.
(Radboud University   )

RARE SNOWFALL BEWILDERS LOS ANGELES RESIDENTS

Many Los Angeles residents took to social media in confusion as a rare snowfall came to the area.
(Los Angeles Times   )

SWISS GLACIAL MELTING INCREASING HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION

Climate change has accelerated glacial melting in Switzerland, resulting in a 3-4% increase in hydropower production since 1980.
(New York Times   )

HOMES PRODUCING OUTDOOR AIR POLLUTION

Many household tasks including cooking and cleaning generate significant levels of chemicals in the average home, causing indoor air quality levels equal to polluted cities.
(University of Colorado-Boulder   )

INDIANA HAS ITS FIRST NATIONAL PARK

President Donald Trump signed a spending bill that, among other measures, changed the name of an Indiana park from Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore to Indiana Dunes National Park.
(Indy Star   )

SUPREME COURT TAKES UP CLEAN WATER ACT CASE

The Supreme Court on Tuesday announced it will hear a broad case on the Clean Water Act that could have major implications for utility infrastructure, particularly coal ash disposal facilities.
(Utility Dive   )

VISITORS EXPOSED TO URANIUM AT GRAND CANYON MUSEUM

For nearly two decades at the Grand Canyon, visitors passing by three paint buckets stored in the National Park's museum may have been exposed to unsafe levels of radiation.
(The Arizona Republic   )

CHILDREN SUFFER MORE FROM AIR POLLUTION

Only 10 percent of the world population is under five years old, but those kids bear 40 percent of the burden of environmentally related diseases, according to the World Health Organization.
(Popular Science   )

CHINA PLANS SPACE-BASED SOLAR POWER STATIONS

The Chinese government says it wants to be the first country to launch power stations into space that capture the Sun’s energy and beam it back down to Earth.
(Nature   )

WARMING PACIFIC WATERS KILLING SALMON

Climate change is causing rising water temperatures in the Pacific Northwest, killing salmon before they can reproduce.
(Popular Science   )

OCEAN COLORS TO CHANGE THIS CENTURY

By the end of the 21st Century many of the world’s oceans will change colors as the level of phytoplankton changes.
(MIT News   )

POLAR BEARS INVADE RUSSIAN ISLAND

Authorities on the Russian island Novaya Zemlya declared a state of emergency after dozens of polar bears moved to the communities in search of food.
(BBC News   )

HUMANS ARE EATING BIG ANIMALS INTO EXTINCTION

A new study attributes the extinction of mammoths and mastodons in North America to human hunting. The hunting of animals such as African elephants, rhinos and whale sharks puts them at risk of the same fate.
(Popular Science   )

SWEDISH PLAN OFFERED AS CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTION

Swedish scientists say solving the planet's climate change problem requires decarbonization and an expansion of nuclear power.
(New York Times   )

KEY WEST BANS SUNSCREEN HARMFUL TO CORAL REEFS

The Key West City Commission banned the sale of sunscreens containing oxybenzone and octinoxate, which scientists have deemed harmful to coral reefs.
(Miami Herald   )

CHINESE METHANE EMISSIONS CONTINUE RISING

China consumes half the world’s coal and continues to produce more methane gas despite government regulations to reduce emissions, according to a new study.
(New York Times   )

SEEING THE GOOD IN EXTINCTION

The Eastern cougar subspecies was officially declared extinct as of Jan. 22 and removed from the endangered list by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Scientists say this removal could be a good thing.
(National Geographic   )

ROCKS ON THE MENU FOR ALLIGATORS

Researchers thought alligators swallowed stones to help digest their meals or accidentally ingested them in the process of catching their meals. But now they think there might be another explanation.
(Integrated Organismal Biology   )

NATIONAL PARKS RECOVERY BEGINS AS SHUTDOWN ENDS

The 35-day government shutdown affected animals, ecosystems and set back important construction and restoration projects.
(Popular Mechanics   )

STUDENTS TAKE TO THE STREETS FOR THE PLANET

Hundreds of thousands of students across Europe are skipping classes to protest for action against climate change.
(New York Times   )

FILLING POTHOLES HELPS CUT POLLUTION

Keeping streets, highways and freeways maintained may reduce pollution.
(Popular Science   )

CANADIANS FIND SAFER WAY TO TRANSPORT OIL

Transporting oil comes with the risk of costly, deadly spills, but Canadian researchers found a safer way that is quintessentially Canadian: molding it into pucks.
(Popular Science   )

FIGHTING SMOG WITH RAIN

To fight its major air quality issues, Thai officials are looking to the skies. They're dispersing chemicals in an effort to make rainfall.
(Popular Science   )

"WHAT THE HELL IS GOING ON WITH GLOBAL WARMING?"

As temperatures in the Midwest drop well below zero, climate change skeptics are increasingly weary of the argument that the planet is warming up.
(New York Times   )

AIR QUALITY A FACTOR OF HAPPINESS

U.S. and Chinese researchers analyzed millions of tweets to track the relationship between air quality and happiness levels. Residents in urban areas of China are less happy on days when air pollution is high.
(MIT   )

PART-NIGHT STREET LIGHTING HELPS NOCTURNAL POLLINATORS

British researchers found that dimming street lights for even part of the night can help nocturnal insects pollinate plants.
(Science Daily   )

PLANTS ABSORB LESS CO2 AS CLIMATE WARMS

Researchers have found that plants and soil in warmer climates may start absorbing less carbon dioxide, accelerating the rate of climate change.
(Nature   )

MORE THAN HALF OF WILD COFFEE SPECIES FACE EXTINCTION

About 60 percent of the 124 wild coffee species worldwide could face extinction as a result of being isolated in a single geographic location and because of harvesting by the timber industry.
(Science Advances   )

DECLINING NUMBERS BODE POORLY FOR MONARCH BUTTERFLIES

The western monarch butterfly population in California dropped alarmingly this winter, which could be a signal of the potential end of the species.
(Western Monarch Count Resource Center   )

RECYCLE YOUR OLD PHONE, SAVE THE GORILLAS

You probably don’t think about gorillas when using your cellphone, but there’s one reason you might. Mining for minerals used in cellphones is destroying gorilla habitat in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
(Mongabay   )

A PLANET-FRIENDLY DIET (THAT'S NOT VEGAN)

A new dietary recommendation promises to be good for your health and good for the Earth but doesn’t eliminate entire categories of food the way veganism does.
(Popular Science   )

MOVING TREES TO PROTECT MONARCH BUTTERFLIES

Researchers in Mexico plan to move hundreds of fir trees nearly a quarter of a mile up a mountain to save the migratory butterfly's winter habitat.
(Nature   )

A RECORD NUMBER OF AMERICANS CARE ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

According to a new poll, nearly three-quarters of Americans said global warming is happening global warming and personally important.
(New York Times   )

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS UP

A 3.4 percent spike in U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2018 is the second largest annual gain in more than 20 years.
(Rhodium Group   )

DETROITERS SAY "NO THANKS" TO FREE TREES

Detroit residents say distrust of government, not a dislike of trees, led to many turning down the offer of free trees.
(New York Times   )

SCIENTISTS DEVELOP A HOUSEPLANT THAT CAN CLEAN YOUR HOME'S AIR

Scientists at the University of Washington have genetically modified a houseplant, pothos ivy, to remove harmful chemicals from the air.
(University of Washington   )

CLIMATE CHANGE SURVIVAL SCHEMES

As climate change intensifies, architects, designers, and scientists are devising better ways to deal with almost anything nature throws our way.
(Popular Science   )

ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY EVENTS

A new Indiana University Residence Hall Association Green Events Bill ensures environmentally friendly events at IU Bloomington dorms.
(Indiana University   )

TRACKING ENVIRONMENTAL ROLLBACKS

The NY Times tracked how the Trump administration's rollback of nearly a decade's worth of environmental regulations is affecting different parts of the U.S.
(New York Times   )

DIVINING ROOTS

British researchers have discovered how plant roots change their shape to acquire the most water. The discovery could lead to the breeding of plants adaptable to climate change.
(The University of Nottingham   )

URBAN WATER DEAD ZONES

A new study has found that hypoxic dead zones found mostly in rivers and coastal waters also occur in freshwater urban streams.
(Duke University   )

FROM CLIMATE DATA TO FASHION STATEMENT

A group of knitters is turning archived NOAA data into a wearable record of the Earth’s changing climate.
(Earther   )

TREE RESIN TO THE RESCUE

Researchers say the resin of the loblolly pine tree could help produce greener alternatives for many goods made with oil and gas.
(Popular Science   )

TOWN FROG, COUNTRY FROG

Scientists observed that urban frogs can adapt better to rural environments than rural frogs can adapt to the city. The discovery could show how urbanization will affect wildlife.
(Popular Science   )

AN UNNOTICED ALLY

Investigative reporters at Inside Climate News say Big Oil has teamed up with a surprising ally to fight climate change science and legislation – the American Farm Bureau.
(Inside Climate News   )

FOLLOWING THE BABY POWDER CANCER LINK

A new report claims Johnson & Johnson may have known for decades that its baby powder contained or was contaminated with asbestos, a known carcinogen.
(Reuters   )

KEEPING TRACK OF SOLAR PANELS

Researchers at Stanford University have figured out a way for artificial intelligence to use satellite imagery to count solar panels from space.
(Stanford University   )

COVER CROPS CAUSING WARMER TEMPERATURES?

The cover crops farmers use to protect and enrich their soil could be causing warmer temperatures in the northern U.S. and Canada.
(National Center for Atmospheric Research   )

NO MORE CHRISTMAS TREES?

Agricultural experts worry whether the next generation of Americans will be interested in keeping the Christmas Tree farming tradition alive.
(U.S. Department of Agriculture   )

UNDERREPRESENTED INSECTS

A new study found that biology books are devoting less time to insects, and entomologists are worried that could lead to a misunderstanding of ecosystems and biodiversity.
(NC State University   )

A SECRET WEAPON TO FIGHT CLIMATE CHANGE

Australian researchers say they may have found a secret weapon in the battle against climate change.
(Earther   )

A COVERT CAMPAIGN

A New York Times investigation has uncovered a "stealth campaign" by a major oil refiner, oil industry groups and a pro-fossil fuel policy network to roll back car emissions standards.
(New York Times   )

FALKLANDS ISLAND FOR SALE

A British island in a former war zone and current International Bird and Biodiversity Area is now up for sale.
(BBC   )

MOST ARCTIC ICE ALREADY GONE

A new study by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has found that 95 percent of the Arctic’s oldest and most resilient ice is already gone.
(NOAA   )

REDUCING GAMING'S CARBON FOOTPRINT

Gamers in America emit about 12 million tons of carbon dioxide powering their gaming platforms. Some quick fixes could drastically reduce gaming's carbon footprint.
(Mother Jones   )

WORSE THAN WE THOUGHT

Not only is climate changing putting people’s lives in danger, it’s doing so at an accelerated pace. Three trends are making climate change worse.
(Nature   )

THE TROUBLE WITH GRIBBLES

British scientists are looking into whether a wood-eating coastal creature can teach us how to turn wood into a more efficient fuel source.
(Popular Science   )

OIL EXPLORATION THREATENS ARCTIC WILDLIFE REFUGE

More than 19 million acres of the federally protected Arctic National Wildlife refuge could soon be threatened by fossil fuel exploration.
(New York Times   )

BALLOONS COULD HELP FIGHT MALARIA

Scientists in West Africa have deployed a surprising weapon in the fight against one of the world’s deadliest diseases: balloons.
(Popular Science   )

OLD MACDONALD HAD A COAL MINE

British researchers have figured out a way to turn abandoned mine shafts and tunnels into productive farms.
(BBC   )

A FAMILIAR SIGHT

Biologists in the United Kingdom say some birds pick mates who remind them of their parents.
(Nature   )

A TEST NO ONE WANTS TO FAIL

The United Nations found that greenhouse gas emissions increased to a point where temperatures would actually increase by 3.2° C.
(United Nations Environment Programme   )

NOT-SO-PUBLIC LAND

A new study found that thousands of square miles of public lands cannot be accessed by the public.
(Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership   )

THANKSGIVING FACT, THANKSGIVING FABLE

The Thanksgiving holiday is one full of tradition and custom for many Americans. But did you know the holiday began as a way to celebrate the sharing of environmental knowledge?
(U.S. Department of Agriculture   )

AN ENVIRONMENTALLY RESPONSIBLE FEAST

Taking a day off to eat doesn’t mean you have to take a day off from caring about your planet. Here's how you can enjoy Thanksgiving festivities while lowering your environmental footprint.
(Accuweather   )

CAN OVERCONSUMPTION KILL?

Eyeing another slice even after you're full of food? In extremely rare instances, overconsumption can be deadly.
(Popular Science   )

NOT YOUR PARENTS' YELLOWSTONE

The Yellowstone National Park of the future will be very different than the one Americans have seen in the past -- all because of climate change.
(NY Times   )

BLOW FLIES RESEARCH AS THEY FEAST

A researcher at IUPUI is studying how blow flies can be used to collect information about the diversity of animals in the environment.
(Indiana University   )

A NEW KINGDOM?

Canadian researchers have rediscovered a unique life form that may belong to a new kingdom of life.
(Popular Mechanics   )

EPA,IDEM CRACK DOWN ON INDIANA METALS COMPANY

The EPA and IDEM accused a company based in northwest Indiana of repeatedly violating federal health standards.
(Chicago Tribune   )

KEYSTONE CONSTRUCTION STOPPED…FOR NOW

A federal judge has temporarily halted the construction of the 1,200-mile long Keystone XL pipeline.
(Washington Post   )

Let Fallen Leaves Lie

Letting fallen leaves accumulate on your lawn instead of raking them up benefits nature in several ways.
(Indy Star   )

US Supreme Court allows historic kids’ climate lawsuit to go forward

Case aims to compel the government to slash greenhouse-gas emissions.
(Nature   )

The Trump Administration Flunked Its Math Homework

The administration’s clean-cars rollback is riddled with errors. In one case, it forgot to divide by four. In another, it accidentally deleted 700 billion miles of driving.
(The Atlantic   )

World-first: Bio-bricks from urine

The world’s first bio-brick grown from human urine has been unveiled by University of Cape Town (UCT) master’s student in civil engineering.
(University of Cape Town News   )

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